Verses From A Deeply Darkened Mind – Book Review

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Verses From A Deeply Darkened Mind

by Mary Genevieve Fortier
JWK Fiction

I have to confess, I’m not a big fan of traditional poetry. Reason being is most of the symbolism and metaphors are missed by me and in the end, I’m usually left with a bunch of nice sounding words that don’t make much sense (did you ever try reading Milton’s Paradise Lost? Ugh!). That is why I have always liked Edgar Allan Poe. His poems were stories that I could easily digest and understand. Now I can add Mary G Fortier to my ‘poets I love’ list. This collection contains dark, visceral tales of terror with accentuating rhyme, cadence and word crafting, allowing me to truly enjoy the terror spilling from its pages.  

Mystical doorways in the woods, creepy church goers, and macabre figures knocking at your entrance in the deep, dark hours of the night, are reasons to keep me awake and to keep on reading. I chose to read a few each night in order to quench my thirst for the macabre and fulfill my own dark passions. There are several B&W art pieces accompanying select poems throughout the book by a host of fantastic artists. If you’re in need of a haunting experience into the ethereal world of the dead and those left behind to ponder, then “Verses…” is an excellent collection. Those with a proclivity for creepy horror will be thrilled by these rhythmic tales of terror. Read them by firelight or lamplight and enter the oblique nightmare world of this modern poet, a definitive horror poet’s omnibus to add to your reading repertoire.

Traditional Paperback only: https://www.amazon.com/Verses-Deeply-Darkened-Genevieve-Fortier/dp/9492558025

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Grim Rhymes & Scary Tales – By Sebastian Crow – Book review

 sebastian-crow-grim-rhymes-and-scary-talesGrim Rhymes and Scary Tales

by Sebastian Crow

 

Grim Rhymes and Scary Tales contains just what the title advertises. The tales are in some instances written with a poetic cadence, and the rhymes often tell a tale more straightforward than your usual poetry.

In Coffin Sam we are introduced to an interesting character, Samuel Coffin. He is a bone man, one that collects and repurposes bones both animal and human. Despite his morbid trade, he considers himself a cut above his brethren, as he travels the countryside in his horse drawn wagon collecting the best bones from every village. He meets some interesting characters in his travels, especially on the night in question when he picks up a set of perfect skeletons from frequent trading acquaintance, Maggie. These bones have a lot to say about their death and their probable future. Yes, Sam can hear their gripes. They convince ol’ Sam to bring them up the road to the druid ruins so they can avenge for their deaths. It’s a fabulous horror tale with genuine interesting characterization and an engaging plot. One of my fave lines from the tale is “Lies pass his lips as easily as dung from a horse’s ass.”

Company Men sets up an apocalyptic future with poetic descriptions. It’s a world where an incurable outbreak leads to these massive body burning factories and we follow the short but poignant tale through the eyes of one of the plant workers.

The Legend of the Crying Woman leads into the story, Cry Baby, which is genuinely scary if you read them back to back. It drives home the local legend angle with great tension and atmosphere. Loving the Dead begins so disgusting and horrible; I had to catch the vomit at the back of my throat after the first few paragraphs. Of all the vile, repugnant, disparaging words I’ve ever read, this is by far the most disgusting… Of course, I had to keep reading.

In The Worm of Mysteries, we get a full blown Lovecraftian tale set in modern times. The Watcher in the Dark was even more Lovecraftian as Crow’s writing style adapts to Lovecraft’s, sebastian-crowpermeating the Elderitch Tale with a verbose texture as yet unforeseen, describing a hideous coming of ill-gotten fate. (See what I did there?). It gets even better for the Lovecraft fan as Procession of the Dhole tells about the aftermath of the Lovecraftian apocalypse as the Great Old Ones reclaim their dominance in this little corner of the Universe and the remnants of mankind struggle to eke out an existence.

Sebastian sure knows how to weave a creepy yarn. One aspect I like about the book is the amount of diversity in the stories. Some are tightly wound tales with deep character voice, some are set in days gone by, others are modern tales of a grand scale in nature. Added to the melee are short and entertaining rhymes that add disquiet to the collection. It’s a fun read with quality horror stories that will charm as well as thrill you.

Available on Amazon.com kindle or paperback

Grim Rhymes and Scary Tales

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Horror Fiction Book Review Blog-athon – 2016

Horror Fiction Book Review Blog-athon – 2016

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Check out the reviews for these great horror fiction books:
(click on links to see reviews)

carrie-stephen-king dracula-vs-frankenstien stephen-king-it

chad-lutzke-of-foster-homes-and-flies the-bazaar-of-bad-dreams-book lovecrafts-monsters-ellen-datlow

traps-joseph-f-parda 100-jolts the-haunted-book

df-lewis-the-best-of  ecstatic-inferno  mr-fox-helen-oyeyemi
darker-tales-from-the-den-dona-fox toys-in-the-attic world-on-fire-sheldon-woodbury

Many Thanks to the bloggers that participated and allowed me to add their links/reviews to this page 🙂

Have you reviewed any horror books this year on your blog?
Put your link in the comments and I’ll post a pic and link on this page. (sci-fi books too!)

 

The Best of DF Lewis – by DF Lewis – book review

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The Best of DF Lewis – by DF Lewis

TAL Publications 1993

 

I first discovered DF Lewis in the small-press horror magazines of the 1980s. He was an unknown author at the time, appearing in home grown magazines amongst other unknowns. I didn’t know what flash fiction was, but I was learning quickly. His stories were little more than a page long and left more of an impression than the featured stories in the publications. Often I reread his stories because they almost seemed like a magic trick. How could it be that the shortest story in the publication is the one that haunts me for the rest of the night?

 

I recently found this chapbook of DF Lewis stories, a limited edition, signed used copy from TAL Publications. There’s 15 stories, but it barely reaches 55 pages. Having not read any of his stories in many years, it was clear from the start I was in for a treat.df-lewis

 

In Jack the Ratter, Jack is hunting rats. Only his concept of a rat and everyone else’s is quite disturbingly different. The barely 300 word Dreamaholic twists in upon itself in demented splendor until the final treat is revealed. The 1k word, Bloodbone effectively creeped me out when an unnamed protagonist travels to the ‘dark side’ of the city for life’s answers. The chap book ends with its longest story, The Weirdmonger, which seems to insinuate that a stranger can completely tear your life apart by imparting a few words upon you.

 

Most of his stories would be considered weird tales or weird fiction but they also have a strong horror element, so much so they are undeniably horror tales, perhaps with a Lewis Carroll undercurrent. Here I am trying to label the unclassifiable. The stories break all boundaries, making perfect sense in their abstract nature, delivering twists that are unfathomable, and leaving the reader mortified yet satisfied. DF Lewis is a mad genius, like Dr. Seuss with ill intent and sinister motives. The collection includes an introduction by Ramsey Campbell.

 

Currently Mr. Lewis is active in the underground press reviewing fiction and publishing anthologies by authors who align with his fiction mantra. He has published over 1,500 stories in his lifetime. He has won the Karl Edward Wagner Award from the British Fantasy Society for his accomplishments and also been nominated for his Gestalt Real-Time Reviewing of fiction books. For more info about DF Lewis check out his blog:

https://dflewisreviews.wordpress.com/

For a bibliography, click here:

https://www.fantasticfiction.com/l/d-f-lewis/

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parlor of horror’s books and book reviews

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Horror Fiction Book Review Blogathon! Join the fun!

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November is Horror fiction month here at Parlor of Horror

 

And we’re going to celebrate with the
Horror Fiction Book Review Blogathon!

Want to join the blogathon? It’s simple. If you have reviewed a horror book recently or plan to review a book, post it at your blog and leave the link in the comments on this page. Then post the Horror Fiction Blogathon logo banner (above) on the page with the review. I will reblog your reviews (for those on wordpress) all month long and then post a master list near the end of the month (for those that I cannot reblog, (ei. for those on Blogger, Wix, or other blogger sites).

If you need to contact me with any questions about the blogathon, my email address is on the “contact” page

 


 

In the meanwhile, I will continue offering posts pertaining to readers and writers all month long. From book reviews to fiction links to interesting articles for writers and authors, it will be a month full of great horror fiction.

I’ll also do a post or two featuring book cover artists.

Look forward to hearing from y’all, Happy gruesome Tales!

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My short story, “Dead Song” in Moon Books Presents, Horror Anthology 2016

Some of my long awaited submissions, are finally coming to fruition this fall. The 1st of them is this anthology where I share  the TOC with some horror greats including, Joe R Lansdale, Jonathan Maberry, and Jim Goforth…

Moon Books Presents – Horror Anthology 2016

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featuring:

Jonathan Maberry – Mystic
Joe R Lansdale – Incident On and Off a Mountain Road
Thomas M Malafarina – Foreword and The Path
D.F. Holland – Gathering of Souls
Tim Marquitz – The Err Apparent
Jim Goforth – Dead Tree Creepers
Michael Thomas-Knight – Dead Song
Ken Goldman – Road Kill

Check it out here:
https://www.amazon.com/Horror-Anthology-2016-Books-Presents-ebook/dp/B01M8IIMII