Giants Legend and Lore

rhodes-colossus
Giants Legend and Lore

Stories involving Giants can be found in all cultures, from the earliest Mesopotamia stone carvings to recent American legends of Paul Bunyan and John Henry. Particularly tall men are born from time to time and their unusual stature can be attributed to some of the tales and folklore spoken through generations. Add to that some vivid imagination, fear, and a healthy dose of alcohol, and you have the ingredients for a tall-tale about a giant man.

Giants were also used to explain natural phenomenon that could not be explained by a people’s knowledge of the world at any particular time. Thunder was giants at play, earth tremors and quakes were walking giants and volcanoes were the burning blood of a long buried giant. Following, are some of the legends and folklore of giants through the ages.
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Historical Giants

The earliest known organized culture is thought to be the Sumerians in the Mesopotamia Valley. They have left behind stone tablets depicting life at the time. Many of those carved images depict the “Giant Kings,” men with six fingers, perhaps 12 to 18 feet tall, that the citizens are bowing down to and worshipping.

Recently there were a series of photos from excavations labeled The Sumerian Giants, which showed archeologists digging out extremely large skeletal remains from rock and desert areas. These were proven to be fakes and product of a Photoshop Contest taking place on the web.
sumerian giant excavation Sumerian-giant-skeletons

Greek and Roman culture had many tales of mythological giants. Their giants battled the Gods, lost, and were banished to their own land. However, many negotiated release or had interactions with humans who came upon their islands. Cantharos, Talos, and the battle-of-the-cyclopsCyclops were among the most famous Greek giants.

The Colossus of Rhodes was a giant statue that straddled the two land masses at the seaport of the Roman city. Ships had to come in sailing under the giant statue in order to reach the seaport. It is believed that the Romans had some kind of weaponry associated with the statue to guard against enemy ships. Perhaps it dropped rocks from above onto enemy vessels. This gave rise to rumors that the the-colossus-of-rhodes 1961Colossus would come alive to defend Rhodes from invasion.

In Norse mythology, the first living entity was a giant, Ymir was born of chaos. Their giants also challenged the Gods and were banished to their own lands.

Welsh folklore and legend produced Ye Olde’ English Tales of Jack the Giant Killer. There were several tales besides the “beanstalk” tale most are familiar with. Jack had battles and skirmishes with giants, Cormoran and Blunderbore.

Legends and tales of Ogres circulated throughout Europe and Trolls were popular in Scandinavian folklore. In the Bible, David slew Goliath the giant, with a rock and his slingshot.

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Modern Giants18-giant-skeletons-found-giants found in burial mounds near Lake Delavan, Wisconsin, in May 1912

In more recent times, Native Americans had told of a tribe of giants in the area just east of the Rocky Mountains. In 1912 several bodies were dug up from burial mounds near Lake Delevan, Wisconsin. The skeletal remains were 10 feet tall and there were 18 bodies in all.

Famous in American folklore, Paul Bunyan was a master lumberjack and said to be 20 feet tall. He was always seen with his companion, a giant blue Ox named, Babe.

In the 1890’s, The Cardiff Giant was the mummified remains discovered in a farmer’s field, in New York State. The farmer put it on display at his home in Cardiff, NY, and people came from all corners of the US to see the Giant. It was later proved to be a hoax. A year previous, the farmer had carved it out of stone and he and his neighbor had buried it. When he dug it up in front of witnesses, it seemed like a major archeological find.

The Cardiff Giant  can still be seen today in Cooperstown, NY at the Farmer‘s Museum.
Cardiff_Giant Cardiff Giant pic 2

The Muffler Man Giants

A restaurant on route 66 in Arizona had at one time erected a giant fiberglass statue of Paul Bunyan holding an axe as a landmark for their establishment. Soon these statues were popping up across the US as landmarks for Muffler Man stores and tire companies (Uniroyal). The axes were replaced with mufflers or tires.  These companies have changed locations or closed stores, but the Paul Bunyan statues (and variations of them) remain. To this day they are referred to as Muffler Man Giants. To find one near you visit: www.roadsideamerica.com


mufflerman-aug8-01 MufflerMan Muffler_Man_with_Hot_Dog 

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Naturally, this is just a brief overview of Giants throughout the ages. Hope you enjoyed the pics I’ve gathered. If anyone witnesses a giant in the near future, please let me know so I can add it to my post, thanks! 😉

Check out my reviews covering Giants in movies:
Jack The Giant Killer (1962)
Creature Features – There be Giants! 

And giant creatures, in books:
Monstrous – 20 tales of Giant Creature Terror

jack poster The Colossus of Rhodes 1961 Jack the Giant Killer cover
jack_the_giant_slayer pic 01

Jack The Giant Killer (1962) – movie review

Jack the Giant Killer coverJack The Giant Killer (1962)

This fairytale film is based upon stories from the book of the same name. The King of Cornwall celebrating his daughter‘s birthday, befalls an evil scheme. Princess Elaine, is kidnapped by a giant, but before the giant can make his getaway, he is slain by Jack, a simple farm hand. The evil wizard, Pendragon, then sends witches to kidnap the princess and is successful. He puts a spell over the princess and declares, he and she will be married, therefore making him the new King. However, Jack, along with new comrades, a Viking, a young boy and a leprechaun, invade Pendragon’s lair and save the princess once again. Pendragon summons a two-headed giant to exact revenge but the leprechaun summons a dragon to battle with the beast. Jack and the dragon defeat the giant and sail away, leaving Pendragon in his exiled land.

jack killer 5I saw this for the first time when I was about eight years old and thought it was fantastic. It was soon after that I discovered the secret of stop-motion animation. As an adult, I can clearly see that the animation is not nearly as detailed or smooth as the work from Harryhausen or as realistic as O’Brien’s work. The film’s script is decent enough and could hold-up to much of the famed mythology films (the Sinbad films, Jason and the Argonauts, etc.) However, the claymation is more aligned to children’s shows, especially evident when it comes to the dragon. It would seem that since the story was a fairytale, perhaps the filmmakers didn’t want the monsters to be too realistic or too scary despite showing a bleeding giant and some skeletal creatures.

The first giant in the film is enjoyable to watch, but the effects take a downhill turn from there on out.  It is for this reason that the film does not stand the test of time compared to its monster movie predecessors and mythological successors. If you’re a fan of stop-motion like me, you’ll probably want this in your collection. Just don’t let anyone catch you watching it and really digging it, unless you’re sharing it with your young son.

 

Movies I want to see in 2012

Just a few movies I am looking forward to seeing:

 I enjoy dark, brooding films. This one is a fictional story based on Edgar Allan Poe:

The Raven

 

Tim Burton’s stop motion figures come to life in his latest film:

FrankenWeenie

A new sci-fi masterpeice by Ridley Scott? We’ll see.

Prometheus

Having grown up watching all the Harryhausen/Scheer fantasy movies, including Jason & the Argonauts and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad, I have a nostalgic desire to see these new fantasy/mythology films:

Wrath of the Titans

Jack the Giant Killer


That’s all for now,

I’ll post some more at a later date.